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17.07.17 #DeepSkyBlue #003bb0 #Battersea 18.07.17 #GoGreen #10fee4 19.07.17 #c41e22 #VividRed #DustyDog 20.07.17 #howdyhues #ffffff #PureBrilliantWhite   21.07.17 #000000 #JetBlack #SharonsCat 24.07.17 #889293 #CoolGrey #EnglishSummer 25.07.17 #54b1ab #PMS325 #Turquoise 26.07.17 #54d15 #MexicanOrange #BBQ #Burritos #HavelockTerraceBBQ @SantanaGrill 27.07.17 #1648dd #DLRBlue 28.07.17 #ff6801 #Tangerine #RideLondon #Cycling … Continue reading

We only need a logo…

We were asked to put together a proposal and costs to design a logo for a Tudor stately home. Our proposal was rejected immediately on receipt because we used the term ‘brand identity’. They didn’t want a ‘brand’, they just wanted a logo.

This raises the question: can any business, even one rooted in Tudor history, decide it doesn’t want a brand? By wanting a logo they are acknowledging that they need an identifier of some kind? If it wasn’t required to do anything more than signpost, why wasn’t just writing the name sufficient? Perhaps they thought that a ‘logo’ would be cheaper than a ‘brand’.

Every company and organisation – even individuals in some cases – have a brand, whether they choose to manage it or not.

The logo is the visual representation of the organisation – an identifier – and once used on a website, visitor leaflets, merchandise and signage it builds a bigger visual picture that further develops the perception and, dare I say it, builds the brand.

Businesses with a clear vision of what they are and what they want to be, who choose to manage how they are perceived through their visual branding, are the most likely to succeed and build a memorable, cohesive brand aligned to their vision and future ambitions.

A logo used without control and consistency and without considering the bigger picture, quickly becomes devalued and can, potentially, drag the rest of the organisation with it.

I hope they end up with a well thought through, appropriate logo that’s aligned to their future plans as well as being rooted in their Tudor history. You don’t have to use the word brand to create one but whatever label you put on it, without careful management you’ll probably end up wasting your groats.